Organised crime involved in illegal fishing and the sale of endangered species were the main concern for the government in 2011/12

Organised crime involved in illegal fishing and the sale of endangered species were the main concern for the government in 2011/12.

According to a report released by the Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources, which included an analysis of criminal offences, organised criminals were involved in 7,400 offences, up 40%, from 7,000 in 2009/10.

The Ministry said: ‘Organised crime can be difficult to detect because its activities often involve small groups, often individuals who have never met. Organised crime 바카라사이트is most likely to have their activities carried out by someone from a specific area.’

The report also found that illegal wildlife trading was responsible fonatyasastra.comr $6.4 billion in illegal wildlife trade transacti우리카지노ons, with illegal wildlife trade accounting for more than 10 per cent of illegal animal trade in 2011/12.

Rent is the top item in the illegal wildlife trade, with the highest levels of poaching being found in Western Australia (6.5 per cent), Northern Territory (6.2 per cent) and New South Wales (5.8 per cent). The highest levels of poaching were found in Queensland (16 per cent), New South Wales (14 per cent) and Victoria (10 per cent).

Livestock are another important source of revenue for criminal wildlife trade activity, accounting for almost 7 per cent of illegal wildlife trade revenue.

Invasive species have become a major source of revenue for organised crime. The report found that the largest category, non-native birds, became a main source of revenue for criminal wildlife trade in 2011/12.

Carcass has become an increasing source of revenue for organised crime, with the largest numbers of offences involving invasive species, accounting for 22 per cent of those committed in 2011/12.

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